"Day Dreamer" by A.R Vincent, copyright 2012

What do you dream of doing?

“What’s your dream? Everybody comes here; this is Hollywood, land of dreams. Some dreams come true, some don’t; but keep on dreamin’ – this is Hollywood. Always time to dream, so keep on dreamin’.” ‘Pretty Woman’ (1990)

I popped on some music yesterday, whilst trying to write, and ended up getting all nostalgic. I started to think about the dreams I had for my career and my life back when I was a teen and how different they are from what I want now… and yet, with the wisdom of hindsight, how flaming obvious it was that what I’m doing now was always ‘there’, like the shy girl at the prom, waiting to be noticed.

These days we’re constantly barraged with messages that what we want is to be rich and famous and if we get these things all our problems go away and, despite plenty of evidence to the contrary, many believe it. But finding and nurturing a dream – whether it is of a career, family, lifestyle – is, I think, important and finding the right dream for us and the path that will lead us to happiness and fulfilment is something we should do carefully.

Of course it’s not always obvious, even when we get older and allegedly wiser, what we would be happiest doing… let me give you an example.

Dream a little dream for me…

Three friends in their mid-teens do what they always do on a weekend. They visit each-others houses. Like most teenage girls, these visits involve sweets, caffeine, films, make-up and much talk about boys and music. Unlike many teenagers though, the make-up is usually theatrical in nature, the films are being made on a battered old Hi-8 camera and music is often being composed on an electrical keyboard. But let us get back to the point.

This particular weekend they have an idea for a film, but it involves something they can’t possibly muster…  a cast! So one of the group, who desperately wants to be an actress/film director, suggests animating it. This one of the trio has spent a lot of time messing about making animations with the little camera and dreams of getting her own video camera one day with better functions for making stop-motion. Despite this it has never occurred to her that she wants to be anything but the next Steven Spielberg.

The next friend says that she will pen the script for this weekends film, she has written several scripts (mainly horror movies) for these ventures before. This girl passionately wants to be a make-up artist when she gets older, hopefully in the film industry, but she does spend a lot of time making up stories rather than faces.

The last of the trio, who unlike the other two does not want to work in the creative industries but instead sees her future as an academic, sets to work creating some music and sound effects to go with the film. She has studied piano nearly all her life, penned a musical in her spare time and often spends time composing at home but sees herself eventually becoming a university professor.

Now how many of this trio do you think works in the profession they claimed so fiercely that they wanted to work in? None! Unsurprisingly, the ‘make-up artist’ is a successful novelist, the ‘academic’ works in the music industry and the ‘actress’ works in animation. Bet you didn’t see that coming! You did? They didn’t!

A dream is a wish your heart makes…

Of course, these girls dreams did not develop in a vacuum. They were the result of what they had learnt, not just about the professions but also about the world and themselves, and were probably more closely associated with getting away from what they were then developing an art form and profession.

Perhaps what I’m trying to say here –if I’m trying to say anything – is that you shouldn’t listen to external influences when it comes to your dreams or even always trust your ego. Instead, I would suggest, finding out what makes you feel good. If you feel fulfilled when you draw or paint then do more of it and see where it leads. If helping someone gives you a buzz then keep on and find a path in that. It doesn’t have to be a dream job, it could be a hobby or lifestyle as long as when you reach your dream you find contentment there.

No matter your age, gender, race or circumstances, you can still find a dream that makes you happy.

"Mr. Animator - life cycle of a project" by A.R Vincent, copyright 2012

Does Freelancing Equal Freedom?

For some freelancing is the chosen alternative to permanent or agency work, for others it’s the way to start on the ladder whilst they find a permanent employer and for yet others it is the only route in their chosen profession. Many who have the choice as to whether to go it alone or work under the umbrella of an employer say they choose the former because it gives them a greater freedom. But for those naïve souls just bumbling in to the creative world, what does that ‘freedom’ actually entail?

The Customer Is Always Right

I think the first thing to point out is that freelancing does not give you carte blanche to be lazy, self-involved, isolationist or antisocial. In fact you must be the antipathy of those things – diligent, organised, hard-working, personable, professional, communicative and friendly.

Freelancing gives you a greater choice in which projects you work on, as long as you choose enough of them to put food on the table, but that doesn’t mean you can whimsically indulge your creativity and do things how you want. Oh no, you have a client to think about and by their very nature they will have a budget, a time frame, a brief and most likely a plethora of ideas. You may still need your mad skills to deliver on the projects but each project is about the client and not about you exploring your art and yourself. This does mean, however, that you can choose work that drives your career and your portfolio in a specific direction, again, as long as you can make that pay of course.

So Does Freelancing Give You Any More Freedom?

Yes. Much of the time, as a freelancer, you have the flexibility to choose when and where you work, both in terms of the contracts you take and the hours and environment you work in. Many freelancers work from home or their own studio (depending what they do) and freelancing can be a super option for those with other commitments to work around.

However, as ever, this can be a double-edged sword as great power comes great responsibility and you could end up working long in to the night to make sure a project is delivered on time. As any home worker knows, scheduling and discipline are your friends as a freelancer. Not having a separate work environment means that there is no clear-cut off point and work will happily chew up your entire life if you let it. Sometimes, especially when you are starting out and don’t know your own limitations you may take on too much and if so you will need to man up to the task even if it means running on empty in terms of social life, family commitments and sleep for a while to do it. Additionally for the freelancer, like those who self-publish or are in any way self-employed, those responsibilities also come in the form of promoting yourself, dealing with complaints and queries and filling out your tax return.

I’m certainly not trying to put anyone off freelance work – I freelance – and it does offer the awesome freedom of being able to pick and choose what you do. You are not constrained by the same obligations and chains of command as those who are employed on a permanent basis which means, as long as you can drum up enough to pay your overheads, you can seek out the jobs you want and create an interesting and diverse portfolio and working life. As with so many things, if you get it wrong the freelance world will become your prison and a tireless task master, but if you get it right then it will show up as a world of dream jobs and interesting, fulfilling and challenging opportunities!